You are here

AT&T

Companies Routinely Steer Analysts to Deliver Earnings Surprises

With nudges and phone calls, analysts are urged to lower their estimates, making it easier for companies to beat them; ‘a rigged race,’ says Barry Diller
Original publication date: 
Thursday, August 4, 2016 - 11:58

In April, AT&T 

U.S. Corporations Increasingly Adjust to Mind the GAAP

The use of figures that exclude certain items is becoming more prominent in corporate filings
Original publication date: 
Monday, December 14, 2015 - 20:28

A financial obfuscation of the dot-com era is making a comeback: Hundreds of U.S. companies are trumpeting adjusted net income, adjusted sales and “adjusted Ebitda.”

Companies Cash In on Tax Breaks From Employee Retirement Plans

Original publication date: 
Thursday, January 31, 2002 (All day)

 

Rosel Patton, a 49-year-old switch engineer in Marlboro, Mass., doesn't realize it, but when she saves for retirement by contributing to her 401(k), she's also helping her company save money.

The CEO Health Plan

In Era of Givebacks, Some Executives Get Free Coverage After They Retire
Original publication date: 
Thursday, April 13, 2006 (All day)

At a time when companies are scaling back health benefits for other retirees, former top executives at many corporations are receiving partial or full lifetime medical coverage on top of pensions valued at millions of dollars, a Wall Street Journal analysis of dozens of recent securities filings indicates.

How Lucent's Retiree Programs Cost It Zero, Even Yielded Profit

Trusts Paid the Tab -- Till Now; Facing Need to Use Cash, Company Imposes Cuts A Handy Tool for Downsizing
Original publication date: 
Monday, March 29, 2004 (All day)

Henry Schacht, Lucent Technologies Inc.'s former chief executive and still a director, met with retirees in 10 states last fall to explain why Lucent was cutting their medical and life-insurance benefits.

Well-Hidden Perk Adds Up To Big Money for Executives

Deferred-Compensation Plans Give Tax Benefits, But Are Poorly Disclosed and Add to Liability
Original publication date: 
Friday, October 11, 2002 (All day)

Last year, John R. Stafford, chairman of pharmaceutical giant Wyeth, earned $1.8 million in salary. He also was awarded a $1.97 million bonus, restricted stock valued at $724,283 and 630,000 stock options.

That much shareholders can learn from glancing at the company's proxy.

Subscribe to RSS - AT&T