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Bank of America

Boards Get More Independent, but Ties Endure

Outside directors have connections to companies and executives they oversee
Original publication date: 
Tuesday, January 19, 2016 - 15:16

Shareholders like their corporate boards stocked with independent directors—men and women unencumbered by close ties to the company or its executives.

The SEC Speeds Up Its Enforcement Arm

SEC officials signal an enforcement division that functions more like a criminal prosecutor's office
Original publication date: 
Friday, August 7, 2009 (All day)

It has been a big week so far for the market cops at the Securities & Exchange Commission: Each day brought a new multimillion-dollar settlement, most involving high-profile people or companies—Bank of America (BAC), General Electric (GE), and two former executives of American International Group (AIG), plus two smaller trading firms.

Banks: Good News — and Bad Assets

Despite a comeback on Wall Street, the heaps of toxic debt aren't going anywhere. Be warned: Banking losses will be playing out for years
Original publication date: 
Thursday, June 11, 2009 (All day)

Regulators, investors, and policymakers are breathing a sigh of relief about the banks. Profits are up. Bank share prices are surging. And on June 9 Uncle Sam gave 10 banks the go-ahead to pay back $70 billion in bailout funds. "These are early signs of repair and improvement," Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner said in a press briefing.

Old Banks, New Lending Tricks

Lenders haven't sworn off risky financial products. They've come up with a slew of new ones
Original publication date: 
Wednesday, August 5, 2009 (All day)

That didn't take long. The economy hasn't yet recovered from the implosion of risky investments that led to the worst recession in decades—and already some of the world's biggest banks are peddling a new generation of dicey products to corporations, consumers, and investors.

What Lurks on the Books of Banks

Original publication date: 
Wednesday, December 9, 2009 (All day)

At first glance, banks seem to be recovering nicely from the financial crisis. But investors cheered by optimistic earnings reports could soon face a painful surprise.

Companies Cash In on Tax Breaks From Employee Retirement Plans

Original publication date: 
Thursday, January 31, 2002 (All day)

 

Rosel Patton, a 49-year-old switch engineer in Marlboro, Mass., doesn't realize it, but when she saves for retirement by contributing to her 401(k), she's also helping her company save money.

How Cuts in Retiree Benefits Fatten Companies' Bottom Lines

Trimming a Health-Care Plan Creates Accounting Gains, Under Some Arcane RulesA Shield Against Rising Costs
Original publication date: 
Tuesday, March 16, 2004 (All day)

The loud message comes from one company after another: Surging health-care costs for retired workers are creating a giant burden. So companies have been cutting health benefits for their retirees or requiring them to contribute more of the cost.

Large Banks Quietly Pile Up 'Janitors' Insurance Policies

Original publication date: 
Thursday, May 2, 2002 (All day)

Some of America's biggest banks -- including Bank of America Corp., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., and Bank One Corp. -- hold billions of dollars in so-called janitors insurance on their present and former employees. But investors may have a hard time finding much information in their Securities and Exchange Commission filings.

How Life Insurance Morphed Into a Corporate Finance Tool

Original publication date: 
Monday, December 30, 2002 (All day)

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