You are here

featureme

Lobbyists as Directors Test Rules for Corporate Boards

Directors at some companies are paid to lobby for those firms or allied trade groups, while also helping set the CEO’s pay
Original publication date: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 15:23

At Louisiana health-care company LHC Group Inc., the board’s compensation committee has approved a 90% raise for the chief executive over

Elvis and a Big Hunk o’ Tax Breaks

Expansion of Graceland is benefiting from controversial tax incentives
Original publication date: 
Monday, October 5, 2015 - 18:59

Everything about Elvis Presley was big.

U.S. Corporations Increasingly Adjust to Mind the GAAP

The use of figures that exclude certain items is becoming more prominent in corporate filings
Original publication date: 
Monday, December 14, 2015 - 20:28

A financial obfuscation of the dot-com era is making a comeback: Hundreds of U.S. companies are trumpeting adjusted net income, adjusted sales and “adjusted Ebitda.”

Boards Get More Independent, but Ties Endure

Outside directors have connections to companies and executives they oversee
Original publication date: 
Tuesday, January 19, 2016 - 15:16

Shareholders like their corporate boards stocked with independent directors—men and women unencumbered by close ties to the company or its executives.

New Rule to Lift Veil on Tax Breaks

Accounting standard will require government officials to disclose value of property, sales and income taxes that have been waived
Original publication date: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 17:50

Cities and states have plied companies with tax breaks for decades hoping to attract jobs and commerce. A new accounting standard will force many to disclose the total annual cost.

How Google, GE and U.S. Firms Play the Tax ‘Audit Lottery’

Big Companies Have Amassed $188 Billion in Tax Benefits the IRS May Reject
Original publication date: 
Wednesday, December 17, 2014 - 16:02

Buried deep in American companies’ securities filings is an indicator for how aggressively they are working to shield their income from the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities.

Here is how four companies are ignoring their shareholders’ votes

NYSE Euronext

Forget majority rules. In US-style corporate elections, it’s rarely so simple.

Investors can complain as loudly and clearly as they like, but corporate boards are often free to ignore them, with few or no immediate consequences. That’s true whether the protest involves ousting a board member or changing how the company does business.

Lucrative Consulting Fees Reach Bigger Set

Original publication date: 
Monday, November 19, 2012 - 19:45

When Samuel J. Palmisano retires next month, he'll enjoy a generous goodbye present: The former International Business Machines Corp. chief will earn $20,000 for any day he spends four hours advising his longtime employer.

Have Robot, Will Travel Hospital Halls

Original publication date: 
Monday, July 9, 2007 - 15:48

Next time you’re in a hospital, count the people pushing carts with medications, food and medical equipment. Then count the robots.

Subscribe to RSS - featureme