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CEO Pay Shrinks 4.6% but Offers Weak Reflection of Performance

None of last year’s 10 highest-paid chiefs among the S&P 500 ran one of the best-performing companies
Original publication date: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 14:19

Median pay for chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies slipped 4.6% last year, but the link between annual compensation and shareholder returns remained weak.

Corporate Directors’ Pay Ratchets Higher as Risks Grow

Pay for nonexecutive directors of S&P 500 companies rose nearly 50% between 2006 and 2014
Original publication date: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 15:29

Director pay has received scant attention over the years as investors, regulators and the public have focused on soaring executive compensation. 

How Google, GE and U.S. Firms Play the Tax ‘Audit Lottery’

Big Companies Have Amassed $188 Billion in Tax Benefits the IRS May Reject
Original publication date: 
Wednesday, December 17, 2014 - 16:02

Buried deep in American companies’ securities filings is an indicator for how aggressively they are working to shield their income from the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities.

Tribune Staff Would Bear Risk in Financing Buyout

Tax Breaks Abound, But Business Slump Could Hurt Workers
Original publication date: 
Monday, April 2, 2007 (All day)

The best thing about an employee-stock-ownership plan is that it gives workers a stake in their company's future. Which is also, of course, the worst thing about it.

Enron Executives' Benefits Kept on Growing As Retirement Plans of Employees Were Cut

Original publication date: 
Wednesday, January 23, 2002 (All day)

 

At a time when Enron Corp. was cutting back on its employee retirement plans to save money, executive benefits at the energy company kept getting richer.

Enron Executives Protected Pensions With Partnerships

Original publication date: 
Thursday, February 7, 2002 (All day)

Enron's bankruptcy may have wiped out most of the retirement savings of most of its workers. But one thing it didn't take away were the pensions of its most senior executives. Financial filings disclose that former Enron Chairman Kenneth Lay, for one, used a private partnership to protect millions of dollars worth of executive pension benefits.

Companies Cash In on Tax Breaks From Employee Retirement Plans

Original publication date: 
Thursday, January 31, 2002 (All day)

 

Rosel Patton, a 49-year-old switch engineer in Marlboro, Mass., doesn't realize it, but when she saves for retirement by contributing to her 401(k), she's also helping her company save money.

Deferred-Pay-Plan Proposal Still Leaves Some Loopholes

Original publication date: 
Friday, October 11, 2002 (All day)

Until recently, executive deferred-compensation plans largely escaped scrutiny by regulators. That changed after Enron Corp. filed for bankruptcy late last year, and court documents showed that some Enron executives had withdrawn millions of dollars from their accounts just before the Chapter 11 filing.

Companies Tap Pension Plans To Fund Executive Benefits

Little-Known Move Uses Tax Break Meant for Rank and File
Original publication date: 
Monday, August 4, 2008 (All day)

At a time when scores of companies are freezing pensions for their workers, some are quietly converting their pension plans into resources to finance their executives' retirement benefits and pay.

The CEO Health Plan

In Era of Givebacks, Some Executives Get Free Coverage After They Retire
Original publication date: 
Thursday, April 13, 2006 (All day)

At a time when companies are scaling back health benefits for other retirees, former top executives at many corporations are receiving partial or full lifetime medical coverage on top of pensions valued at millions of dollars, a Wall Street Journal analysis of dozens of recent securities filings indicates.

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